Wednesday, 4 March 2009

DBMM For The Befuddled – Part 13

Well I never thought I’d be writing so many articles in this series.  It’s helped that people have requested I cover things.  Sometimes it’s possible and sometimes it’s not.  The best articles have been the ones that contain a solid issue that, once tackled, really helps people play the game.

Today’s article deals with the issue of fleeing troops.  This is a core outcome move in DBMM and it frequently crops up as a combat outcome and as a response to flank marches.

As pointed out by John Garvey, at a conceptual level the process is simple:
  1. Start the flee move by turning the fleeing element; usually to point away from the threat.
  2. Check to see if the flee move places the element in further jeopardy; such as reaching impassable terrain. If not then flee.
  3. If there are problems with the original flee move, check if they can be avoided. If so turn the element a second time and then flee.
  4. If the problems can’t be avoided flee in the original direction and face the consequences.
As always with DBMM the real complexity comes from the implementation and the application of limiting conditions.  There’s also certain unique bits and bobs to account for; like troops fleeing from combat must recoil first and fleeing impetuous troops turning about at the end of any flee move.
I’ve put together a flowchart for the Befuddled which is the most complex to date; the process spreads itself over two pages.



Part one covers what to do at the start of a flee move and ends with the element facing away from the threat.  Part two covers the consequences of the flee move, any changes in direction and the various outcomes.

As always this is available as a pdf download and all comments, omissions and improvements will be gratefully received.

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